The relationship between fitness and productivity is well documented, and we’re all about productivity.

Earlier this week we discussed using a treadmill desk at work and de-stressing with Progressive Muscle Relaxation. Wrapping up a fitness-and-wellness week is the calorie counter, diet and exercise tracker app, MyFitnessPal.

Here’s how it works: Download MyFitnessPal app, and create an account by providing an email address and password. This allows you to synch your data online and make it available on your desktop. Next, enter your age, height, gender, current weight, and goal weight. You also choose a weekly goal – from “maintaining your current weight” to “losing up to 2 pounds per week”. A daily calorie goal will be automatically generated. Then start recording your daily food intake and exercise. That’s it!

I started using the Lose It app which we covered in a prior post, but after falling off the wagon due to a ton of not-so-great excuses, decided to jump back on. This time I gave the highly recommended MyFitnessPal a go.

MyFitnessPal also requires that you enter an activity level, from “Sedentary” to “Very Active”. The Lose It app didn’t require the extra step and with a goal of losing 1.5 pounds a week, gave me an allowance of 1700 calories per day compared to around 1400 on MyFitnessPal.

A much larger food inventory, search functionality and finer exercising detail rounds out MyFitnessPal’s advantages. Other features include the option to connect with friends to track and motivate each other (I’ll save that for later), barcode scanner for supermarket foods (useful!), and detailed reports.

Creating fitness routines require adapting to changes in age and circumstance, like a more sedentary lifestyle, or injuries. Sometimes it requires significant behavioral adjustments. Using MyFitnessPal has opened my eyes to the horrors of what I consume and with that awareness, change.

Have you used either of these apps and have a preference? Recommend another? We’d love to hear from you in the commets below.