One of the salient technology conversations of 2010 revolves around our newly found state of constant Internet connectivity. We love our iPhones, Droids, and Blackberries, but apparently they’re not so good for us when abused. Kind of like chocolate. Or booze.

Exhibit A: A recent article in the New York Times declares Digital Devices Deprive Brain of Needed Downtime:

Cellphones, which in the last few years have become full-fledged computers with high-speed Internet connections, let people relieve the tedium of exercising, the grocery store line, stoplights or lulls in the dinner conversation.

The technology makes the tiniest windows of time entertaining, and potentially productive. But scientists point to an unanticipated side effect: when people keep their brains busy with digital input, they are forfeiting downtime that could allow them to better learn and remember information, or come up with new ideas.

I wonder though. As much as I’m an advocate for turning off, couldn’t the same argument be made for sneaking in a few pages of a book or glancing at a Sudoku puzzle?