Legal Cloud Computing Ethics Opinions: Comparison Charts and Resources

Cloud computing, sometimes referred to as software as a service (SaaS), has become a common delivery model for many business applications, like Google Docs, Dropbox, Evernote, and practice management software for lawyers.

The cloud allows lawyers to store, access and share data from any online source, eliminating the need for their own IT department, and the accompanying technology expenses, management, and headaches.

Bar Associations are finally coming on board, with ethics opinions trickling in. 11 of the 50 states have issued opinions, with Massachusetts being the latest to rule that cloud computing is ethical for lawyers.

Finding out which state issued an opinion and trying to make sense of if all just got a lot easier with the Cloud Ethics Opinions Overview and Charts from the ABA Legal Technology Resource Center.

The Resource Center includes a page on Cloud Computing/Software as a Service for Lawyers, a State-by-State Chart of opinions with links and summaries, and more.

If you’re looking to explore a cloud-based solution for your practice, and wish to gather information, the excellent ABA Legal Technology Resource Center is a great place to start.

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