Multiple Dropbox Accounts on One ComputerI’ve become so dependent on Dropbox, that updating a long document – like an 80 page E-Book or 30 slide presentation – without syncing it gives me agita. But what if you have a personal Dropbox account and the document you’re working on is stored in your workplace’s account?

Dropbox doesn’t allow you to store two accounts on your computer, and those with multiple accounts will likely have a personal account synced locally with access to a work account via dropbox.com. Fortunately Dropbox has provided a way to collaborate on documents by sharing folders, so you don’t have to download the document, save it, and re-upload as another version.

Create a folder

Sign into your work account on the web. If the document is housed in a large folder, create a separate folder and drag the document there. Note that although you can share single documents, updates by the person with whom you shared won’t reflect on the original document. Only documents updated within a shared folder will sync with the original.

Dropbox Shared Folders

Share the folder

Right-click (control-click on Macs) on the folder, choose “Invite to Folder”, and enter the email address associated with your personal Dropbox account. Sign out of the work account. Be aware that you can’t share a folder inside another shared folder, and only the owner of the shared folder can revoke access to collaborators.

Check your email and click on “View Folder”. You will be prompted to sign in to view the shared folder. Sign into your personal account and accept the shared folder. The folder is now immediately available in the Dropbox folder on your computer.

Updating and collaborating

Now, whenever you, or others with whom you’ve shared the folde, update a document within that folder, the changes are reflected on the original and all shared instances.

Dropbox is a wonderful cloud storage and file synchronization tool. It’s also a great way to collaborate on projects.

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