If you’ve seen me in person, you’re probably wondering why I would be a total devotee of a nutrition management app called LoseIt (I’m of the skinny persuasion).

However, as a productivity junkie, I’m completely aware of how nutrition affects my ability to think clearly, make good decisions, and operate at peak mental performance.

I like to wring productive output out of my day like a sponge, and the only way to do that is if I’m well-fueled. One look at the glycogen-inspired “decision fatigue” phenomenon shows the link between proper nutrition and mental performance.

LoseIt is an efficient diet-tracker, with a smooth web and mobile interface allowing for quick entry of whatever it was you snarfed down during your meals. Once you get through your first three days, logging your eating becomes a normal habit. It helps you set and track goals, and accommodates for calories burned during zillions of different types exercise (including curling).

I use LoseIt not only to keep a consistent weight, but to track my protein and carbohydrate input. The reporting functions of LoseIt are great, giving you a visual representation of if you’ve hit the USDA’s “MyPlate” allotment.

So now, when I consider my dinner or my snack, it’s in the larger context of my day: what have I eaten so far, what food groups have I ignored, etc.

Tracking food also helps me to stay mindful. Logging my diet keeps me accountable to what I ingest. I used to not think twice about opening up the cupboard and downing a bag of chips.

And proper nutrition is a key ingredient for exercise, whether to prepare or recover from a workout. The better you feel, the more likely you are to stick to a workout routine, and the more you exercise, the more you decrease stress.

It all starts with the gas you put in the car.